Keto Chocolate Cookies

Keto Chocolate Cookies – easy to make with rich chocolate flavor, soft, chewy, gooey, made with simple Keto diet staple ingredients and sugar-free dark chocolate. Each low-carb chocolate cookie has 4g net carbs. Perfect for chocolate lovers!

Keto chocolate cookies on parchment paper

What ingredients do you need to make low-carb chocolate cookies?

  • almond flour
  • salt
  • coconut flour
  • baking powder
  • unsweetened cocoa powder
  • unsalted butter
  • vanilla extract
  • coffee extract
  • eggs
  • sweetener – confectioners or granulated erythritol
  • sugar-free chocolate chips
  • walnuts, pecans or hazelnuts (optional)

Gooey Keto Chocolate Cookie on parchment paper

How to make Keto chocolate cookies?

  1. Preheat oven to 350 F. Line baking sheets with parchment paper.
  2. In a bowl combine the almond flour, coconut flour, salt, baking powder and cocoa powder. Stir to combine.
  3. In a bowl beat together the butter with sweetener. Add the egg, vanilla and coffee extract.
  4. Add in the dry ingredients and beat to combine. Stir in the chocolate and nuts (optional).
  5. Shape 2 tablespoon balls, place on the baking sheet and press to flatten.
  6. Bake foe 12-13 minutes, until the edges are starting to get crisp and tops are set.
  7. Cool to room temperature and enjoy.

Low-carb chocolate cookies on top of each other

What chocolate to use in these Keto Chocolate Cookies?

There are two types of chocolate, that generally work well in Ketogenic baking recipes. They are:

  • Stevia Sweetened Chocolate or chocolate chips
  • Sugar-free baking chocolate

Either one will work, depending on the kind you can find and what you like. Baking chocolate is usually less sweet than Stevia sweetened chocolate, so you may want to increase the amount of sweetener with 1-2 tbsp in the recipe.

Can I eat cookie on Keto diet?

Yes, of course, as long as they are sugar-free and low carb, you can eat cookies in moderation. There are several brands that offer Keto cookies at health stores and online, but I always prefer to make my own at home, when I can. Here are more Keto cookie recipes, I’ve shared throughout the last year.

Keto chocolate chip cookies with nuts on parchment paper

Erythritol substitutes:

I often get a lot of questions about low-carb sweeteners and substitutions. The truth is that different people like different kinds and brands of low-carb sweeteners. And with that said, some of them are sweeter than others.

You can substitute Stevia, Swerve or Monk Fruit (not liquid) for the Erythritol in this recipe.

1 tbsp Erythritol = 1 tbsp Xylitol = 1 tbsp- (minus)1tsp Swerve = 1 tbsp-(minus)1tsp Monk Fruit (not liquid, in the raw)

I’m working on a chart to add to this post including some more low-carb sweeteners for easier conversion.

What is the best sweetener for Keto?

This is a tough question. There is no best sweetener, it depends on you personal taste, preference and the recipe you are making.

Between granulated and confectioners sweeteners, it is true, that some of then work better in certain recipes and situations than others.

I personally like Swerve, which is a little sweeter than regular erythritol, but adds a cool sensation when consumed. Erythritol also adds a cooling sensation, but Swerve seems to have a more noticeable one.

What is Swerve? It is Erythritol that also has oligosaccharides added (prebiotic plant fiber).

Popular low-carb sweeteners:

There are many more, I’ve included some of the most popular.

Erythritol and Xylitol – coming from sugar alcohols

These are natural sweeteners, that are safe to be consumed by humans.

Erythritol

It is naturally found in some fruits and fermented foods. Erythritol is 60-70% as sweet as sucrose (table white sugar) and is almost non caloric.

This sweetener doesn’t affect blood sugar nor causes tooth decay. It is produced industrially in plants, which makes it a commercial product.

Easily absorbed in the bloodstream (about 90% of it is absorbed before it enters the large intestine) and because of that, it generally doesn’t cause any laxative effects after consumption.

Since it is erythritol is less sweet that sugar, you need to use slightly more – 1 1/3 cups to 1 cup of sugar. I usually substitute it 1:1 without any issues ( I like my desserts not too sweet).

Xylitol

It is sugar alcohol, used as a sugar substitute. Can be substituted 1:1 with table sugar. It is an industrial product, often found in chewing gum, toothpaste, candy and dietary supplements and has some calories.

Xylitol almost does not affect the blood sugar, because it is metabolized mainly on insulin. Xylitol supplies 40% less calories than regular sugar.

Sadly is can be extremely dangerous for dogs even in very small amounts.

It may (and often does ) cause GI issues, because almost 1/2 of the consumed Xylitol is not absorbed by the intestines and causes flatulence.

I rarely use Xylitol because of the calories it has, but it does taste ok and works in most baking recipes.

Plant Based Keto Sweeteners – Monk Fruit and Stevia

These sweeteners are plant based and while they don’t taste bad, I rarely use them.

The reason for mentioning them is because a lot of readers seem to use them and ask for substitutions.

I’be tried them in the liquid and blended forms and they work in most recipes, it is just easier to use one form of sweetener, that I like and works in my recipes, especially in baking.

Monk Fruit  

This sweetener comes from a tree that originates in China and Thailand. Its fruit produces extract 300 times sweeter than sugar and does not affect the blood sugar. Researches show that this sweetener does not affect blood sugar levels in humans.

You can find it in its liquid form or also blended with other products, in order to be used for baking. It has no aftertaste, but it is also very sweet to my taste, this is why I rarely use it in my recipes.

Using liquid sweeteners in baked goods could be difficult to convert from sugar, because it messes with the structure of the batters/doughs.

Stevia 

This sweetener has been extremely popular in the last years, but I somehow can not start loving it and using on a regular basis. It leaves a bitter aftertaste after consuming and I can not get over it.

Natural sweetener, extracted from the Stevia plant, native to Brazil and Paraguay. Stevia extract is 30-150 times more sweet than sugar.

The good thing is that the human body does not metabolize the glycosides in stevia and therefore it contains 0 calories.

If you use stevia extract in liquid form, keep in mind than the conversion to sugar and erythritol could be difficult, especially in baked goods. This is why I only use liquid low-carb sweeteners in certain drinks and no-bake desserts.

There are a few baking blends that contain Stevia and have conversion charts on the package.

Monk Fruit vs Stevia – these are both natural, plant based low-carb sweeteners, but unlike Stevia extract, Monk Fruit does not have any after taste.

Artificial Sweeteners – produced in a lab

These include sweeteners like Aspartame and Saccharin. Since they are artificial sweeteners, I do not use or recommend them.

More Keto Cookie Recipes:

Servings: 16

Keto chocolate cookies

Prep Time:
10 mins
Cook Time:
14 mins
Total Time:
24 mins
Easy to make with rich chocolate flavor, soft, chewy, gooey, made with simple Keto diet staple ingredients and sugar-free dark chocolate.
Keto chocolate cookies on parchment paper
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Ingredients

  • 1 cup almond flour
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 3 tsp coconut flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter — melted
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract — optional
  • 1/2 tsp coffee extract — optional
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/2 cup low-carb sweetener — can use confectioners or granulated erythritol or swap 1/4 of this 1/2 cup with brown keto sweetener like Swerve
  • 1/3 cup stevia sweetened chocolate chips or chopped chocolate
  • 1/3 cup walnuts or hazelnuts — raw, chopped (optional)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 F. Line baking sheets with parchment paper.
  2. In a bowl combine the almond flour, coconut flour, salt, baking powder and cocoa powder. Stir to combine.
  3. In a bowl beat together the butter with sweetener. Add the egg, vanilla and coffee extract.
  4. Add in the dry ingredients and beat to combine. Stir in the chocolate and nuts (optional).
  5. Shape 2 tablespoon balls, place on the baking sheet and press to flatten.
  6. Bake foe 12-13 minutes, until the edges are starting to get crisp and tops are set.
  7. Cool to room temperature and enjoy.

Recipe Notes

Total carbs are listed in the nutritional info - 6g.
NET CARBS - 4g.
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: American
Keyword: keto cookies

Nutrition Information

Calories: 138, Fat: 12g, Saturated Fat: 5g, Cholesterol: 25mg, Sodium: 43mg, Potassium: 93mg, Carbohydrates: 6g, Fiber: 2g, Protein: 2g, Vitamin A: 190%, Vitamin C: 0.2%, Calcium: 38%, Iron: 1%